Poll Shows Black Americans Reject Transgender Claim by 10 to One

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    Just three of the roughly 150 blacks interviewed “strongly” agreed that there are more “genders” than female and male. But roughly 102 black respondents strongly denied that claim — which is a core element of the transgender ideology.

    Overall, only eight percent of the roughly 150 black Americans in the poll they disagreed “strongly” or “somewhat” with the claim “there are [only] two genders, male and female.”

    But 82 percent of black respondents agreed with the two-sex option — 14 percent somewhat, and 68 percent strongly.

    The respondents — nearly all of whom vote Democrat — were sharply different from the pro-transgender views of progressives who direct much of the party's policies. Overall, 31 percent of Democrats embraced the claim that there are multiple genders — although 61 percent of Democrats disagreed with that transgender claim.

    This intra-party split is a problem for top Democrats because they have rallied behind the transgender claim amid growing public opposition. Some of that growing opposition is caused by sports scandals where men — who claim they are transgender — are able to push women athletes off of the prize podiums while their womens' parents and friends watch.

    Republican voters overwhelmingly oppose the transgender ideology, as do swing-voting independents, according to the Rasmussen poll. The poll showed that 60 percent of independents strongly agree people are either male or female, while just 7 percent strongly disagree.

    Many black voters — and Latinos — also oppose the federal economic policy of importing migrant workers, consumers, and renters.

    So far, few GOP leaders have endorsed the rising opposition to the transgender claim or used it to win more black voters from the Democratic Party.

    But some with mainstream views are joining the GOP. On December 27, the New York Times profiled Winsome Sears, Virginia's lieutenant governor-elect, who was elected in November alongside the incoming GOP governor Glenn Youngkin:

    Republicans, she said, rarely even tried to sever the old ties between Black voters and the Democratic Party. This is partly why she decided to run this year.

    “I just took a look at the field, and said, ‘My God, we're gonna lose again,'” she said. “Nobody was going to reach out to the various communities that needed to be heard from: women, immigrants, you know, Latinos, Asians, Blacks, etc.”

    She stood to the right of much of the field and was arguably the furthest right of the three Republicans nominated for statewide office. She favors strict limits on abortion, calling Democratic abortion policies “wicked”; she is an advocate of vouchers to help students pay for private school tuition and of tighter restrictions on voting; and she insists that gun control laws do not deter crime — gun ownership does.

    In polls, the “strongly' numbers are far more useful to campaign strategists than the “somewhat” numbers, but they are better guides to the voters' final choices amid the chaos and complexity of political campaigns.

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